A Community Service Project


Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Wellsboro Classic Car Cruise In is Saturday, July 28

The Wellsboro Classic Car Cruise In will be on Saturday, July 28 from noon to 3 p.m. on Crafton Street in Wellsboro. The section of Crafton Street between Water and Main streets next to Citizens and Northern Bank will be blocked off so cruise in vehicles can park diagonally.

Hosted by the Wellsboro Area Chamber of Commerce's Retail Committee, the cruise in offers fun, not only for vehicle owners but also for those who enjoy looking at and learning about classic cars, trucks and motorcycles.

The cruise in is free and open to all. There is no judging and no entry fee for classic vehicle owners and/or drivers and no admission fee for spectators. Each driver or owner who registers a classic vehicle that is 25 years old or older will receive a free dash plaque.

Spectators are welcome to bring lawn chairs, sit in the shade and listen to owners talk about the history of their vehicles - where they found them, the restoration process, the company that made them and what is different or unique about them.

For more information, call the Wellsboro Area Chamber of Commerce at 570-724-1926. 

Register Now for the Saturday, Aug. 11 Eight-Hour NRA Certified Basic Pistol Class at Nessmuk Rod and Gun Club

Register now for the eight-hour National Rifle Association Certified Basic Pistol Class being held on Saturday, August 11 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Nessmuk Rod and Gun Club's outdoor range at 4646 Route 287, 6.5 miles south of Wellsboro in Delmar Township.

According to Lead Instructor Don Imbimbo, the class will start promptly at 8 a.m. Participants are required to arrive by 7:40 a.m. to have their firearms checked.

Those who register for the August 11 class will receive a handbook when they arrive. Topics to be covered will include: Safety, Pistol Mechanisms and Operation, Building Pistol Shooting Skills and Pistol Maintenance, Selection and Use. Upon successfully completing the written test and shooting qualifications, participants will receive a completion certificate.

This handgun training class is open to six people, men and women 18 years of age and older, whether they are novice or experienced pistol shooters and owners. Each participant must bring 100 rounds of ammunition for the handgun he or she chooses to bring for the qualifying shooting test. Anyone who does not own a handgun may borrow a .22 pistol. Ammunition will be provided for borrowed .22s. Participants should also bring eye and ear protection to the class or can borrow it.

Water and soda will be provided. Those attending this class need to bring their own lunch and snacks.

It is recommended that participants dress in long pants, long-sleeve shirts and closed toe shoes to protect arms, legs and feet from hot brass casings coming from semi-automatic pistols. Clothing should be light weight or heavy, depending on the weather. Women are asked not to wear long, dangling earrings, which interfere with sound muffs.

The fee is $50. Participants are asked to bring the fee to class on August 11 either in cash or a check for $50 made out to Don Imbimbo.

To register, each person is asked to email the following information to Imbimbo at dri50@ptd.net: participant's name, address, phone number, email address, year of birth, the model and caliber of the handgun he or she will bring, a brief description of his of her experience level with handguns and whether he or she will need to borrow a pistol and/or ear and eye protection. 

For more details about this class, call 570-261-0302 or email dri50@ptd.net.

AHS 1989 Student Council


Monday, July 16, 2018

Former Venezuelan Official Pleads Guilty to Money Laundering Charge in Connection with Bribery Scheme

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, July 16, 2018

Former Venezuelan Official Pleads Guilty to Money Laundering Charge in Connection with Bribery Scheme

A dual U.S.-Venezuelan citizen pleaded guilty today for his role in a scheme to bribe officials of Venezuela’s state-owned and state-controlled energy company, Petroleos de Venezuela S.A. (PDVSA), and for his role in an international money laundering scheme involving the bribes paid by the owners of U.S.-based companies to Venezuelan government officials to corruptly secure energy contracts and payment priority on outstanding invoices.
Assistant Attorney General Brian A. Benczkowski of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney Ryan K. Patrick of the Southern District of Texas and Special Agent in Charge Mark Dawson of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations’ (HSI) Houston Field Office made the announcement.
Luis Carlos De Leon-Perez (De Leon), 42, a citizen of the United States and Venezuela previously residing in Spain, pleaded guilty today in federal court in Houston to one count of conspiracy to violate the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) and one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering.  U.S. District Judge Kenneth M. Hoyt of the Southern District of Texas accepted De Leon’s plea.  Sentencing is scheduled for Sept. 24. 
De Leon was arrested in Spain in October 2017 and subsequently extradited to the United States after a federal grand jury in the Southern District of Texas returned a 20-count indictment against him and Nervis Gerardo Villalobos Cardenas (Villalobos), 51; Cesar David Rincon Godoy (Cesar Rincon), 51; Alejandro Isturiz Chiesa (Isturiz), 33; and Rafael Ernesto Reiter Munoz (Reiter), 39. 
According to admissions made in connection with De Leon’s plea, between 2011 and 2013, he conspired with Villalobos, Cesar Rincon, Isturiz and others, all of whom were then officials of PDVSA and its subsidiaries or former officials of other Venezuelan government agencies or instrumentalities, to solicit PDVSA vendors for bribes and kickbacks in exchange for providing assistance to those vendors in connection with their PDVSA business.  Specifically, De Leon admitted that he solicited and directed bribes from Roberto Enrique Rincon Fernandez (Roberto Rincon), 57, of The Woodlands, Texas, and Abraham Jose Shiera Bastidas (Shiera), 55, of Coral Gables, Florida, to PDVSA officials in order to assist Roberto Rincon’s and Shiera’s companies, including their U.S.-based companies, in receiving payment priority and receiving additional PDVSA contracts.  De Leon further admitted that he then conspired with Roberto Rincon and Shiera to launder and conceal the proceeds of the bribery scheme through a series of financial transactions, including wire transfers to accounts in Switzerland held in the names of individuals or entities other than De Leon and his co-conspirators. 
As part of his plea agreement, De Leon also admitted to soliciting bribes from other owners of energy companies based in the United States and elsewhere, and directing a portion of such bribes to PDVSA officials in order to assist those individuals and their companies in winning business with PDVSA and to obtain payment from PDVSA on outstanding invoices ahead of other PDVSA vendors. 
Roberto Rincon and Shiera previously pleaded guilty in the Southern District of Texas to charges under the FCPA for their respective roles in the bribery scheme.  Cesar Rincon previously pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering.  They currently await sentencing.
The charges against Villalobos, Isturiz and Reiter remain pending.  Each of the three remaining defendants is charged with one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering and with one or more counts of money laundering.  Villalobos is also charged with one count of conspiracy to violate the FCPA.  Villalobos and Reiter remain in Spain pending extradition and Isturiz remains at large. 
The charges contained in the indictment are merely accusations, and all defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.
De Leon is the latest individual to plead guilty as part of a larger, ongoing investigation by the U.S. government into bribery at PDVSA.  Including De Leon, Cesar Rincon, Roberto Rincon and Shiera, the Justice Department has announced the guilty pleas of a total of 12 individuals in connection with the investigation. 
HSI in Houston is conducting the ongoing investigation with assistance from HSI in Boston and Madrid, as well as from Internal Revenue Service Criminal Investigation.  Trial Attorneys Jeremy R. Sanders and Sarah E. Edwards of the Criminal Division’s Fraud Section and Assistant U.S. Attorneys John P. Pearson and Robert S. Johnson of the Southern District of Texas are prosecuting the case.  Assistant U.S. Attorney Kristine Rollinson of the Southern District of Texas is handling the forfeiture aspects of the case.
The Criminal Division’s Office of International Affairs, the Swiss Federal Office of Justice and the Spanish Guardia Civil have provided substantial assistance.
The Fraud Section is responsible for investigating and prosecuting all FCPA matters.  Additional information about the Justice Department’s FCPA enforcement efforts can be found at www.justice.gov/criminal/fraud/fcpa.

Three California Residents Sentenced in $20 Million Mortgage Fraud Scheme

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, July 16, 2018

Three California Residents Sentenced in $20 Million Mortgage Fraud Scheme

Three owners and/or managers of Los Angeles, California-area foreclosure rescue companies, Dorothy Matsuba, Jamie Matsuba, and Thomas Matsuba, were sentenced to 240, 135, and 168 months in prison today for their roles in a foreclosure rescue scheme, respectively.
Assistant Attorney General Brian A. Benczkowski of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney Nicola T. Hanna for the Central District of California, Assistant Director in Charge Paul D. Delacourt of the FBI’s Los Angeles Division, Acting Deputy Inspector General for Investigations Paul Conlon of the Federal Housing Finance Agency-Office of Inspector General (FHFA-OIG), Special Agent in Charge R. Damon Rowe of Internal Revenue Service Criminal Investigation’s (IRS-CI) Los Angeles Field Office, and Sheriff Jim McDonnell of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department made the announcement.
Dorothy Matsuba, 67, her daughter Jamie Matsuba, 33, and her husband, Thomas Matsuba, 67, all of Chatsworth, California, were sentenced by U.S. District Judge R. Gary Klausner of the Central District of California.  Judge Klausner also ordered the defendants to serve three years of supervised release. Restitution and forfeiture will be decided at a hearing on Aug. 13.  All three defendants were remanded into custody. Dorothy Matsuba pleaded guilty on Dec. 4, 2017, to one count conspiracy to commit wire fraud, false statements to a federally insured bank or mortgage lending business, and identity theft, five counts of wire fraud, six counts of false statements to federally insured banks, and six counts of aggravated identity theft.  On Dec. 13, 2017, after a one-week trial, Jamie Matsuba and Thomas Matsuba were both convicted of one count of conspiracy to commit wire fraud, making false statements to federally insured banks, and committing identity theft and one count of making false statements to federally insured banks.
According to evidence presented at trial, from January 2005 to August 2014, Dorothy Matsuba, Jamie Matsuba, Thomas Matsuba and others engaged in a scheme to defraud financially distressed homeowners by offering to prevent foreclosure on their properties through short sales.  Instead, the conspirators rented out the properties to third parties, did not pay the mortgages on the properties, and submitted false and fraudulent documents to mortgage lenders and servicers to delay foreclosure.  The evidence further established that the conspirators obtained mortgages in the names of stolen identities.  The defendants also used additional tactics, including filing bankruptcy in the names of distressed homeowners without their knowledge and fabricating liens on the distressed properties, the evidence showed.
Two other defendants have been charged in this matter.  Defendant Jane Matsuba-Garcia, 42, of Camarillo, California, previously pleaded guilty and is awaiting sentencing.  Defendant Young Park of Los Angeles, California, is a fugitive.  In addition, in related cases, Jason Hong, 36, of Chatsworth, and Ryu Goeku, 48, of Canoga Park, California, previously pleaded guilty and are awaiting sentencing.   
An indictment is merely an allegation and all defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law. 
This case was investigated by the FBI, FHFA-OIG, IRS-CI, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Central District of California, and the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department.  Trial Attorney Niall M. O’Donnell, Senior Litigation Counsel David A. Bybee and Trial Attorney Jennifer L. Farer of the Criminal Division’s Fraud Section are prosecuting the case.  Senior Trial Attorney Nicholas Acker previously worked on the investigation.
Individuals who believe that they may be a victim in this case should visit the Fraud Section’s Victim Witness website for more information.

Jury Convicts Texas Man of Hate Crime in the Burning of Victoria, Texas, Mosque

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, July 16, 2018

Jury Convicts Texas Man of Hate Crime in the Burning of Victoria, Texas, Mosque

The Justice Department today announced that a federal jury in Victoria, Texas, has returned guilty verdicts on all counts as charged related to the 2017 burning of a local mosque. Acting Assistant Attorney General John Gore of the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division, U.S. Attorney Ryan Patrick, Special Agent in Charge Fred Milanowski of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), and Special Agent in Charge Perrye K. Turner of the FBI made the announcement.
The jury found Marq Vincent Perez, 26, of Victoria, guilty for a hate crime in the burning of the Victoria Islamic Center on Jan. 28, 2017, and for use of a fire to commit a felony. In addition, they found he possessed an unregistered destructive device for an incident that occurred on Jan. 15, 2017.
“All people are entitled to live free from violence and fear, regardless of their religion or place of worship,” said Acting Assistant Attorney General John Gore of the Civil Rights Division. “Perez’s actions were criminal, unlawful, and dangerous. This Justice Department is committed to holding hate crimes perpetrators accountable under the law.”
“This case represents the great coordination and cooperation of many federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies,” said U.S. Attorney Ryan Patrick. “The Department of Justice is committed to protecting the religious liberty of all people and their ability to practice their faith without being the target of this kind of dangerous activity.”
“Houses of worship are scared places in America,” said ATF Special Agent in Charge Fred Milanowski. “We are pleased in the outcome of this investigation, and ATF will continue to aggressively investigate all House of worship fires.”
“Hate crimes are not only an attack on a specific victim, they threaten the cornerstone of diversity that America was built upon,” said FBI Special Agent in Charge Perrye K. Turner. “Perpetrators of hate crimes, like Perez, aim to chip away at our nation’s foundations by instilling fear into entire communities with violence.”
The jury heard from a total of 19 government witnesses, including law enforcement officers, experts, and others who testified about communications with Perez, one of whom detailed how Perez called Muslims “towelheads.” An FBI agent took the stand and described hate-filled messages found on Perez’s Facebook account.  
Testimony in court detailed how Perez planned the event and revealed how he had done “recon” of the mosque in the days leading up to the fire. A witness who was with Perez on the night of the fire described how excited Perez was upon seeing the mosque in flames, explaining that he was “jumping up and down like a little kid.”
Additional evidence presented in court revealed that items taken during two burglaries at the mosque were found at his home, and also an improvised bomb similar to what was used in an attempted car-bombing approximately two weeks prior to the fire.
The jury also heard from an arson expert who concluded the fire was the result of an “intentional application of an open flame.”
The jury found Perez guilty on all counts as charged and deliberated for approximately three hours following a five-day trial.
Perez faces up to 20 years in federal prison for the hate crime and up to 10 years for possessing an unregistered destructive device. For use of a fire to commit a felony, the penalty is a consecutive and mandatory minimum of 10 years in prison. All of the counts also carry a potential $250,000 fine. Sentencing has been set for October 2.
ATF and FBI conducted the investigation along with the City of Victoria Fire Marshal’s Office, Victoria Fire Department, Victoria Police Department, Texas Department of Public Safety - Criminal Investigations Division and Texas Rangers with assistance of Texas State Fire Marshal’s Office and sheriff’s offices in Victoria and Nueces Counties.
Assistant U.S. Attorneys Khandelwal and Kate Suh are prosecuting the case along with Trial Attorney Saeed Mody of the Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division.

Nebraska Man Sentenced to Prison tor Distribution of Child Pornography

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, July 16, 2018

Nebraska Man Sentenced to Prison tor Distribution of Child Pornography

An Omaha man was sentenced to 180 months in prison today for distribution of child pornography, announced Assistant Attorney General Brian A. Benczkowski of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division and U.S. Attorney Joe Kelly of the District of Nebraska.
Lawrence R. Quignon, 51, pleaded guilty to distribution of child pornography on April 23.  U.S. District Court Judge Laurie Smith Camp of the District of Nebraska sentenced Quignon to 15 years in prison and also ordered him to serve 10 years of supervised release.
Quignon was identified via an investigation by the Nebraska State Patrol into a National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) CyberTipline report regarding an individual uploading child pornography onto an online chat service.  During the execution of a search warrant at his home, Quignon admitted to uploading images of child pornography through the online chat service.  Quignon was previously convicted of first degree sexual assault in the State of Nebraska, and is required by Nebraska law to register as a sexual offender for life.
This case was investigated by the FBI Cyber Crimes Task Force and Nebraska State Patrol.  Trial Attorney Nadia Prinz of the Criminal Division’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section (CEOS) and Assistant U.S. Attorney Michael Norris of the District of Nebraska prosecuted the case.
This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice.  Led by U.S. Attorneys’ Offices and CEOS, Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state and local resources to better locate, apprehend and prosecute individuals who exploit children via the Internet, as well as to identify and rescue victims.  For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.justice.gov/psc.

Russian National Charged in Conspiracy to Act as an Agent of the Russian Federation Within the United States

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, July 16, 2018

Russian National Charged in Conspiracy to Act as an Agent of the Russian Federation Within the United States

A criminal complaint was unsealed today in the District of Columbia charging a Russian national with conspiracy to act as an agent of the Russian Federation within the United States without prior notification to the Attorney General.
The announcement was made by Assistant Attorney General for National Security John C. Demers, U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia Jessie K. Liu, and Nancy McNamara, Assistant Director in Charge of the FBI’s Washington Field Office.
Maria Butina, 29, a Russian citizen residing in Washington D.C., was arrested on July 15, 2018, in Washington, D.C., and made her initial appearance this afternoon before Magistrate Judge Deborah A. Robinson in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. She was ordered held pending a hearing set for July 18, 2018.
According to the affidavit in support of the complaint, from as early as 2015 and continuing through at least February 2017, Butina worked at the direction of a high-level official in the Russian government who was previously a member of the legislature of the Russian Federation and later became a top official at the Russian Central Bank.  This Russian official was sanctioned by the U.S. Department of the Treasury, Office of Foreign Assets Control in April 2018.
The court filings detail the Russian official’s and Butina’s efforts for Butina to act as an agent of Russia inside the United States by developing relationships with U.S. persons and infiltrating organizations having influence in American politics, for the purpose of advancing the interests of the Russian Federation. The filings also describe certain actions taken by Butina to further this effort during multiple visits from Russia and, later, when she entered and resided in the United States on a student visa. The filings allege that she undertook her activities without officially disclosing the fact that she was acting as an agent of Russian government, as required by law. 
The charges in criminal complaints are merely allegations and every defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. The maximum penalty for conspiracy is five years.  The maximum statutory sentence is prescribed by Congress and is provided here for informational purposes.  If convicted of any offense, a defendant’s sentence will be determined by the court based on the advisory U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and other statutory factors.
The investigation into this matter was conducted by the FBI’s Washington Field Office. The case is being prosecuted by the National Security Section of the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia and the National Security Division of the U.S. Department of Justice.

Former Business Partner of U.S. Military Contractor Pleads Guilty to Bribery Scheme Related to Contracts in Support of Iraq War

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, July 16, 2018

Former Business Partner of U.S. Military Contractor Pleads Guilty to Bribery Scheme Related to Contracts in Support of Iraq War

A former business partner of a U.S. military contractor pleaded guilty today to one count of bribery for his role in a years-long scheme to bribe U.S. Army contracting officials stationed at a U.S. military base in Kuwait, announced Assistant Attorney General
Brian A. Benczkowski of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division.
According to the plea filed today in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Alabama, Finbar Charles, 62, a citizen of Saint Lucia most recently residing in Baguio City, Philippines, was a business partner of a former U.S. military contractor, Terry Hall.  As Hall’s business partner, Charles facilitated Hall and others in providing millions of dollars in bribes in approximately 2005 to 2007 to various U.S. Army officials in exchange for preferential treatment for Hall’s companies in connection with Department of Defense (DOD) contracts to deliver bottled water and construct security fencing to support U.S. troops stationed in Kuwait and Iraq. 
As part of his role in this criminal conspiracy, Charles managed bank accounts in Kuwait and the Philippines that he used to receive DOD payments and transfer illegal bribes to various U.S. Army contracting officials, including Majors Eddie Pressley, John Cockerham, James Momon, and Chris Murray.  All of those individuals, as well as at least 10 other coconspirators, have pleaded guilty or been convicted of crimes relating to this scheme.  Charles admitted that he personally received over $228,000 in illicit gains as a result of his participation.  
The sentencing is set for Nov. 26.
This case was investigated by the Defense Criminal Investigative Service, the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command, the FBI, and the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction.  The case is being prosecuted by Trial Attorneys Peter N. Halpern and Robert J. Heberle of the Criminal Division’s Public Integrity Section.

Former Second Chance Body Armor President Settles False Claims Act Case Related to Defective Bullet Proof Vests

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, July 16, 2018

Former Second Chance Body Armor President Settles False Claims Act Case Related to Defective Bullet Proof Vests

Richard C. Davis, the founder and former president and CEO of Michigan-based Second Chance Body Armor, Inc., agreed to resolve claims under the False Claims Act in connection with his role in the sale of defective Zylon bullet-proof vests purchased by the United States for federal, state, local and tribal law enforcement agencies, the Justice Department announced today. Mr. Davis will relinquish his interest in $1.2 million in assets previously frozen by the United States and will pay an additional $125,000 to the United States.  This settlement is based on Mr. Davis’ ability to pay.  
Second Chance sold body armor to state, local and tribal law enforcement agencies reimbursed by the Department of Justice’s Bulletproof Vest Partnership (BVP) program and to federal agencies under contracts with the General Services Administration. The United States alleged that Second Chance’s vests were defective due to the loss of their ballistic capability when exposed to heat and humidity. The United States also alleged that by 2001, Davis was aware that Second Chance’s Zylon body armor was degrading at what he described as a “disappointing” rate.
The United States further alleged that, rather than using a $6 million payment from Toyobo Co. Ltd., the manufacturer of Zylon fiber, to fix the degradation problem, Second Chance pocketed the money and Davis and other Second Chance owners began meeting with various investment bankers in an effort to sell Second Chance. These efforts to sell the company allegedly stopped after a Forest Hills, Pennsylvania police officer was shot through his Second Chance Zylon vest in June 2003. Second Chance filed for bankruptcy in 2004 and was liquidated.  
Subsequent tests by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) of Zylon-containing vests found that more than 50 percent of used vests could not stop bullets that they had been certified to stop. The performance of Second Chance Zylon vests were reported to be among the worst.  The NIJ removed all Zylon-containing vests from its list of compliant products, and Zylon is no longer used in ballistic vests.  
“The Department of Justice will pursue those who attempt to fraudulently profit at the expense of the United States, particularly when the stakes are life or death,” said Acting Associate Attorney General Jesse Panuccio.  “Bullet proof vests protect the brave men and women of our nation’s law enforcement community, and those who manufacture and sell these products have a solemn duty to ensure their safety and efficacy.”
"Fraudulently presenting false claims to the government regarding products intended to protect the lives of public servants is illegal and utterly unacceptable," said Carol F. Ochoa, Inspector General of the U.S. General Services Administration.
“I again want to emphasize that marketing faulty protective gear to law enforcement officers who put themselves in the line of fire is an unconscionable act and a betrayal of trust” said Jon Adler, Director of the Bureau of Justice Assistance. “Our unwavering priority is to protect our officers as they keep our communities safe.”
The settlement resolves, in part, allegations filed in a lawsuit by Aaron Westrick, Ph.D., a former employee of Second Chance, under the qui tam, or whistleblower, provisions of the False Claims Act, which permit private individuals to sue on behalf of the government for false claims and to share in any recovery. The Act also allows the government to intervene and take over the action, as it did in this case as to the allegations against Davis. Dr. Westrick will receive $28,750 plus a share of whatever the United States ultimately recovers from the previously frozen funds.    
This settlement is part of a larger investigation of the body armor industry’s use of Zylon.  The United States has previously recovered over $132 million from 18 corporations and individuals who participated in the sale of Zylon body armor. The Civil Division has transferred over $22 million of these recovered funds to the BVP program to replace BVP funds which had been used to purchase Zylon vests. The funds transferred to the BVP program will be used to fund the purchase of additional ballistic-resistant vests for state, local and tribal law enforcement officers. The United States is continuing to pursue claims against Honeywell International Inc., which allegedly sold a laminated version of Zylon for use in police armor.
The investigation and litigation of this matter were handled by the Civil Division’s Commercial Litigation Branch; the General Services Administration, Office of the Inspector General; the Department of Commerce, Office of Inspector General; the Defense Criminal Investigative Service; the U.S. Army Criminal Investigative Command; the Department of the Treasury, Office of Inspector General for Tax Administration; the Air Force Office of Special Investigations; the Department of Energy, Office of the Inspector General; and the Defense Contracting Audit Agency.   
The claims settled by this agreement are allegations only, and there has been no determination of liability.  The lawsuit partially resolved by the settlement is captioned United States ex rel. Westrick v. Second Chance Body Armor, et al., No. 04-0280 (PLF) (D.D.C.).